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entrepreneurs are transforming the global economy. you also serve as an adviser to the clinton global initiative. what do you advise on? >> welcome to for asking me that question. i was just a global initiative in the last three days, and i've been working with them for the last three years and the reason i am thinking you is i really appreciate that affiliation. they had a wonderful platform and they made advisers on the program. what sort of things to feature, what will bring new ideas and challenge that audience to think about the different ways to engage in the world. it's particularly relevant because and every participant bad as they register this year they received a copy of "time" magazine in which president clinton had authored and essay entitled the case for optimism. and that the clinton global the initiative this year chelsea clinton wrote a session called the case for optimism. and then again she was interviewed by charlie rose and the was the focal point of the conversation. and so, you know, i am totally synchronous with that message and the quantum global initiatives focus on fin
black president, bill clinton. [laughter] now, all little nap here for you. things start off at the white house and move along pennsylvania avenue toward the capitol which is on the right. there is a traditional copy of the white house the takes place. it's a big deal on the days when there's a transition from one president to another. it began in 1961, net was a year or allow these pictures were made available. you don't normally see these pictures. here's eisenhower and kennedy command at the same time you have four women together, and these four women actually were the first ladies of our country between 1953 and 1974. on the left that's eisenhower who was the of calling firstly with her back to us, ladybird johnson, jacqueline kennedy who became the new first lady in 1961, and pat nixon, the outgoing wife of the vice-president at that time. another thing that takes place on inauguration day one is a change of power is that by tradition yet going president leaves and of for his successor. this is the note. this would be the larger envelope that was left in the oval office
of womanizing. for example bill clinton was not the first and bill clinton was not the worst when it comes to misbehavior in high office. there's a long history of it and arnold schwarzenegger and john edwards, david petraeus had nothing on alexander hamilton. if you read for example letters written by martha washington going to the winter camp, she didn't complain about the weather. she didn't complain about the harsh conditions but she did complain about one thing. there was a was a tomcat one winter that was misbehaving and it was noisy and kept her awake at night so she nicknamed the tomcat alexander hamilton. because of all the young girls will come into the camp. i also did a book a few years ago called life in the white house about the presidents and these. what hobbies do they have? what were their fears and hopes and what did they -- or were they like his fathers and husbands as another way of stressing presidential characters providing us with another lens. we are all still trying to figure out -- and for example nixon in his free time like to bowl alone and sometimes wore a blac
the services took place for america's first black president, bill clinton. [laughter] i have a little map for you. things start at the white house and they move along pennsylvania avenue toward the capitol which is on the right and there's a traditional copy of the white house that takes place and it's a big deal on the days when there's a transition from one prison to another. again, 1961 and that is when a lot of these pictures were made available. you just don't normally see these pictures. here's eisenhower and kennedy together, and at the same time, you have the when women together and they were actually the four -- they were the first lease of our country between 1953 to 1974. its eisenhower who was the outgoing first lady with her back to us that this lady bird johnson and others jacqueline kennedy who became the new first lady in 1961 and pat nixon who was the outgoing wife of the vice president at that time. another thing that takes place on inauguration day when there is a change of power is that by tradition field going president leaves a note for his successor. this is the not
be 40 times. three times this year alone during the carter and clinton administration is deeply involved in policies between the u.s. and israel. iran from the perspective of someone who has relatives in israel, has spent many, many years in israel. so if a unit perspective looking from the outside in and the inside out. >> ambassador eizenstat come israel is one of the few foreign-policy issues in the 2012 campaign. mitt romney saying he a sinuous anti-semite between the u.s. and israel. is the u.s. relationship and vice versa a healthy relationship? >> it is a remarkable relationship between one of the nations that have the smallest majority in israel had our great country. it's almost a mystical relationship when he think of how much support we have showered on israel and how much support we get back. it is due to the fact that this is not just a jewish support. barely 2% of the population united states. it is because we have shared values, shared enemies and islamic terrorism that many people in the united states viewed israel as the holy land. not just jews, but not jews as well. it
individuals like ambassador stevens and secretary clinton that there was actually someone to talk to. became the -- the head of the national economic development board which is part of the safe reform efforts, became the foreign minister / prime minister under the international transitional council and is now the head of the largest, you know, as insulin on islamist party in libya right now. this, you know, you could say that the human rights lawyer who interacted very frequently with the president of the mtc, the person who launched at. this is a group of people that communicated with each other. they all have their own causes and networks. talking about social networks as a factor in the arabs bring states, in terms of the big it really wasn't facebook or twitter were things like this. it was out cesura. houses are brought the spotlight to what was going on in libya when no one else knew exactly what was happening. but these networks and individuals managed to essentially to, if only because he was the son of gaddafi. so the rest of the book talks about the actual unfolding of the revoluti
there is a celebrity intervention at the commander, hillary clinton was delayed in sending reinforcement, partially due to the fact that clinton was entertaining a celebrity new york. i celebrity king george found prince william henry. diane also comments on a bit of irony. october 19, day of the surrender, the day clinton said from new york to provide this those reinforcements. have been one of the ships in the fleet to canada is commanded by cornwallis' younger brother. which then brings me to the kind of ice bucket, what i would call paper preservation discoveries. prior to 1870 come before the transition, newspapers were printed on rockland stock. paper made primarily off the backs of the columnists of what people were. also ship sailed. rats are oiled and ultimately sifted into the sheath to pay for and durability of the paper plays a significant role in the preservation and that today we can find 200-year-old newspapers that are in better lake position of last week's boston globe. so thanks to the rachlin and paper in which they are printed and thanks to the institution, we have these wonderful p
of the act. with bill clinton chronicles how those merchants were celebrating and when the doors opened they had as ship ready to speed across the atlantic to tell the americans good news. [laughter] >> after the boston massacre there was a brief discussion should be sent a ship's captain? a bostonian said i will carry the report to london. they decided they could not afford it. the royal government sent their own report. so in 1775 that is why the massachusetts government was not willing to spend the money. they knew they could be skipped if they did not. >>. >> we will continue questions downstairs. also signings of the book. let's continue downstairs. for our panelists. robert, a tired, and john todd andrlik is a publisher of raglan did, >> it is always a treat to be in this store it is a wonderland. about five years ago a friend suggested that i share rightabout ms. green. [laughter] i said to? she was called the which up on wall street. she was interesting but finance and wall street? then it was 2008. and everything changed the stock market collapsed collapsed, real-estate
that william jefferson clinton is william jefferson clinton. [laughter] by the way, president clinton is still campaigning somewhere. [laughter] i don't know how anyone's going to tell him we voted. maybe he's already starting on the next one. i want to talk a little bit, we -- jefferson, the politician, jefferson, the renaissance man, jeff the symbol -- jefferson, the symbol, you know, secessionists wanted a piece of him in the run-up to the civil war, frank lib roosevelt -- franklin roosevelt wanted him in the runup to world war ii. he can be used in any way you need partly because he was so articulate and so prolific. 20,000 or more letters, brilliantly written, wonderfully eloquent. so what can we make of him? this is, this ises the man, the human being we have, you know, and that's what i always want to get to. answering president kennedy's question, what was he like. in the service of trying to figure this out, i asked for and was granted permission to sleep in jefferson's bedroom one night on a pallet on the floor, i hasten to add. [laughter] and wanted to hear how the clock sounded. je
system for decades upon decades. when he saw through the end of the clinton administration is sort of dismantling a lot of those protections. and as a result, you saw an increase of risk in the financial sector, and these explosions, these monstrous frankenstein banks. those that are so big that the failure of anyone which has been deemed to bring down the entire financial system. we saw this enormous crisis. so i do think that washington has played a role with deregulation. also just bad regulation. by being too overly deferential with financial institutions, looking the other way, really egregious misconduct that led to the crisis that had created this giant housing bubble of the exploded so painfully. i think the regulators do certainly share the burden of blame along with the financial institutions of the. >> "bailout" by neil barofsky is a bestseller. we have a caller on the line. please go ahead for your question for neil barofsky. >> caller: yes, i want to thank you for writing this book. it has opened my eyes to exactly what happened. i remember when they were voting on thi
she gave a speech and you can take away a thing or two and you can take away the hillary clinton name and just look at the text. the speech she gave on the development assistance was one of the most accurate scene on the topic of the international development. what did she say? a couple things that no one ever says that everybody knows to be true. number one objective, -- chu listed three but it's the most significant. the development assistance is not in the business of self propagation. it should be a time line of when does it end, when we stop, when do believe in haiti and pakistan and anywhere else in the world. timeline to zero. vitally important, she said that. she said getting directly back to your question she talked about corruption as an obstacle to the development. but she titled directly between corruption and poor countries and corruption in the united states inside the beltway contracts that are fed back and she talks about the development. we can talk about a lot of other systems, and tying the line that we are also a part of the world subject to the same kind of f
. in 1993, president clinton presented him the presidential medal of freedom. this bareboned account of sargent shriver's life achievement suggests but does not describe the spirit of a man that was a devout catholic and inspired and inspiring father. how can we understand this. and the motivation of such a first kyl and resilient man. striving to understand sargent shriver, i think of the inflated clown toy perhaps two and a half or 3 feet tall favored by 2-year-olds around the world and at the bottom end of the way there is a bag of sand so that no matter how often you push him down, she springs back upright again. it's fun if you are two but sargent shriver was like that his whole life, no matter how long the circumstances pushed him down. rather in the fight to is to ambush the peace corps or the vice presidential nominations for ten, threatened or the war on poverty derails become the dismal electoral rebuffs in 1972 or the dauntless alzheimer's no matter how many times he got pushed out he came around upright again and he soldiered on ever the optimist and ever the visionary. w
clinton when some people wanted to indict bill clinton. but i continue to think that the president and the president alone has that kind of immunity until he's out of office. >> host: there was one other during nixon's presidency major issue you faced -- >> guest: there was of only one other major issue? >> host: there were quite a number. that was one particularly strike anything this regard, when, concerning archibald cox and his role as special prosecutor. and two of the leading people at the department of justice resigned after being ordered to fire cox and refusing to do so, as i understand it. and you, you executed that order. can you talk about that a little bit? because i think a lot of people know a little about that but haven't heard much of the details there. >> guest: no, the difficulty is i'm working on a book right now which will cover that subject in some detail, and i -- it's a hard summit to discuss in three -- subject to discuss in tree sentences. but, as a matter of fact, elliott richardson, who was attorney general, and bill who was the deputy attorney general,
a lawyer and investment banker and budget director under president clinton. for a while people were talking about him as possible treasury secretary. and in may, rains carried on with new policies of jimmy johnson. the clinton administration and iman. in july 1999, secretary cuomo announced fannie and freddie would increase the percentage of their mortgage financing that went too low or moderate income families to 50% in 2001 from 42% that was set back in 1995. these new rules would provide affordable housing for 28.1 million families over the next decade. think about it. cuomo could promise to create 20.1 million homeowners without asking congress to set down a single penny. simply told fannie and freddie to do it. and they said we would be delighted. you remember how jesus said 5,000. cuomo housed twenty-eight.1 million. rains also has ambitious goals for profits. he set a goal of doubling earnings to $6.46 per share within five years and this $6.46 number was taken seriously by his team. this is a pep talk from a senior vice president at fannie mae. you must be able to say it in your sle
, the attention to deday. >> host: two of brad's fans are presidents george w. bush and president bill clinton as well. next call from beverly in maryland. hi, beverly. >> how are you today? >> host: good. >> guest: good. >> caller: my question is for brad. i read your article -- >> host: we're listening . >> read your article on your english teacher and how you went back to her retirement, and it was the most laudible thing i had read, acknowledging how good teachers can be, and i wondered if you stayed in touch with her and to thank you for that wonderful tribute. >> guest: i appreciate that. that was in parade magazine. i tell you what happenedtime. won't e won't believe the end of the story. when i was in nine grade, my english teacher, sheila spicer, said to me you can write. and i said, anyone can write. she said, no, you know what you're doing. she tried to put me in the honors class but i had a conflict. so she said, you're going to sit in this corner for the entire year, ignore everything i do at the blackboard, every homework assignment i give, and she was saying you're going to do t
to financing here. it's politically controversial. president clinton proposed taking some t.a.r.p. money and providing financing to manufacturers, but even if we're not directly loaning companies, manufacturers money, what we can do is at least provide the right tax incentives that if they are willing to export or manufacture, that they have those incentives. the final point i'd say is there's an awful law in the world trade organization which allows companies -- countries that have indirect taxation, the value added tax, to exempt their exporters from that taxation, and if you have the corporate tax like we do, we are not allowed to exempt our manufacturers from that tax. now, we established the world trade organization at a time where we really didn't think anyone was going to compete, and we wanted to encourage other countries to build their industries, but the world has changed, and i think on a bipartisan basis, we need to push for a change in those wto, the sanction between indirect and direct taxation when it comes to tax credits for exports. sure? >> if you've come across compani
service of the mine which is illegal by the way under the u.s. law. they were busted by the clinton administration, stripped of insurance, but they have henry kissinger on the door, so they got everything worked out. this has 18,000 people working at 15,000 feet. straight down through glacier. it's the biggest gold mine and basically the biggest cotton - the world. but, people are shocked. there's a huge battle going on because they're putting 300,000 tons of waste every single day in the two rivers without, like in america you can't do that. but there you just play with on and it doesn't matter. so, what you are asking is to be pushed off and if you do you push it puts a to china who doesn't care. yeah it's much worse. at the bottom line is america is actually good about mining in terms of world standards we have the highest standards really of safety the you are talking about huge amounts of toxic metals that they admittedly don't know how to control. it is in the they don't want to be and i do not think they are evil by nature they just don't know how to do at. in arizona may be
california. first george bush, texas by a connecticut. bill clinton from arkansas, and the second bush from texas. so 2008 is in some ways a watershed election. it is this 40 year period of sun belt dominance. and there were issues that are critical in the politics that develop, that came out of the sun belt. they tended to have a conservative task to them. they tended to be oriented around history of strong national defense, of an opposition to unions and a defense of free enterprise politics. and also it's in the sun belt, in the south and southwest that we see the rise of what we see by the 1970s is becoming to talk about as the religious right, the rise of evangelical involved in the clinical process in new and important ways. so thurmond was at the forefront of all of those issues in his own politics. national defense, he was a staunch anti-communist. he played an important role in right wing anti-communist populist politics in the late '50s and early 1960s. it's one of the things that led him to switch parties in 1964. he was a key figure in opposing labor unions. he did so alongside
, and they are the ones that got shafted because there was a bipartisan move. clinton was president. the republicans mainly were running congress when we have rings like nafta, china's most favored nation status, the wto, the world trade organization. all these trade deals -- trade deals that people believed were going to bring jobs to the united states, and in every case the jobs left. >> in now on booktv, the history of united states in 1862. is the second year the civil war and specifically reactions of president abraham lincoln. it's a little over an hour. [applause] >> the thank you very much. a wonderful crowd. thank you to regnery books, a real asset to our community here. with all these programs. i am glad to see my kids in the audience, who asked me to mention their names. henry, alice, abby, claire and my wife karen is here and my mother doris and many friends but also the basis as well. thank you all for coming out. i appreciate your time and interest. in "rise to greatness" i tell the story of the most eventful and perilous time in american history, 1862. as much as possible i tell it th
class figures and they are the ones that got shafted because there was a bipartisan move. clinton was president, the republicans mainly were running the congress when we had things like nafta, china most favored nation status, the wto, the world trade organization, all of these trade deals that people claim were going to bring jobs to the united states and in every case the jobs left. >> many publications are putting together their year-end list of notable books. book tv will feature several of the books focusing on the non-fiction selections. these titles were included in foreign policy magazines must read books to give in breakout nations in pursuit of the next economic miracles on the set is another author we want to introduce you to a and this is brian. here is his book castor's secrets the cia and the intelligence machine. if you could start by giving us your background, particularly your cia background. >> i worked at the national intelligence council in washington for about 45 years. i ultimately became the national intelligence officer for latin america which is a tree or
repeals, and the repeal for those who don't know was signed by bill clinton as president. helping to deregulate. what did we have? the taxes on the rich were gone ridge of, taxes on corporations were reduced, regulations on business were gone ridge of. what is it we saw? we saw that by not changing the organization of capitalist enterprise, we left in place people with the incentives and the resources to undo everything that had been achieved in the great depression. we learned a powerful lesson. it is like winning a war but leaving the enemy with other armaments. they might use their weapons to try again. if you leave in place a corporate capitalist structure, a small group of major shareholders will own the shares in their hands. d. a. therefore select the board of directors and remember what a board of directors does in every corporation, it decides what to produce, how to produce, where to produce and what to do with the profits. for americans this struck a moral political issue. we are in a country which claims it is committed to democracy. we say that about our political act
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21

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